Resource Library

1 year 8 months
2015 / PDF
This toolkit helps in developing a general plan for enhancing leadership and its core tasks. Although it is written largely from a community health perspective, its methodology is transferable to other subject areas.
1 year 9 months
2006 / PDF
As First Nations move towards greater self-governance, First Nations leadership will face increasing challenges in managing the growth of their administration and adapting their governance structures. As First Nations regain greater control over these structures, the result will be broader and more sophisticated organizations, with more departments, sections and divisions, and greater...
Author(s): Murray Browne, Jeanie Lanine and Kathryn Deo, Woodward & Company
1 year 9 months
2014 / PDF
The purpose of this toolkit is to support and to strengthen the work of funders in the implementation of the Declaration. The Toolkit seeks to elaborate ways funders can engage respectfully and positively with Indigenous Peoples within the context of the Declaration. It is designed to provide funders with guidance on how to include the implementation of the Declaration in the grantmaking...
Author(s): Curtis Kline
1 year 9 months
2015 / PDF
This article is about constitutionalism as an Indigenous tradition. The political idea of constitutionalism is the idea that the process of governing is itself governed by a set of foundational laws or rules. There is ample evidence that Indigenous nations in North America—and in Australia and New Zealand as well—were in this sense constitutionalists.
Author(s): Stephen Cornell, University of Arizona
1 year 9 months
2014 / PDF
Australia, Canada, and the United States formally apologized to their Indigenous peoples in February 2008, June 2008, and December 2009, respectively. The Indigenous peoples in these countries are relatively small in size and Indigenous issues usually lack salience in national elections, so these near simultaneous apologies appear somewhat surprising. All three came after years of pressure and...
Author(s): Michael Tager, Marietta College
1 year 9 months
2014 / PDF
In this article, I examine how the process of Indigenous participation in policy-making pertaining to the development of federal sport policy in Canada is connected to Indigenous forms of self-determination. By conducting semi-structured interviews with six Indigenous sport policy-makers, I investigate how their respective thoughts, experiences, and actions shape their perspective on self-...
Author(s): Braden P. Te Hiwi, The University of Western Ontario
1 year 9 months
2014 / PDF
The lack of good data about U.S. American Indian and Alaska Native populations hinders tribes’ development activities, but it also highlights a space for sovereign action. In coming years, tribes will no doubt continue to advocate for better national data and at the same time increasingly implement their own “data agendas” by gathering high quality, culturally relevant information about their...
Author(s): Jennifer Lee Schultz, University of Arizona; Stephanie Carroll Rainie, University of Arizona
1 year 9 months
2014 / PDF
Questions of data governance occur in all contexts. Arguably, they become especially pressing for data concerning Indigenous people. Long-standing colonial relationships, experiences of vulnerability to decisionmakers, claims of jurisdiction, and concerns about collective privacy become significant in considering how and by whom data concerning Indigenous people should be governed. Also...
Author(s): Jodi Bruhn, Stratéjuste Consulting
1 year 9 months
2014 / PDF
This article discusses the obstacles to and supports for the implementation of the First Nations Principles of OCAP™, specifically in the context of data holdings within Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) and the Government of Canada. It cites three types of barriers (legal, knowledge and capacity, and institutional) that obstruct OCAP™ and examines how federal legislation...
Author(s): First Nations Information Governance Centre
1 year 9 months
2004 / PDF
A Paperless trial is theoretically possible
Author(s): Murray W. Browne

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